Why Freelance Domainers Have All The Fun

Nested proudly in motor homes, tiny cubicles and even hidden in their parent’s basements from Siberia to South Beach, and Azerbaijan to Anchorage, are the domainers of the world. Never complaining about subpar commissions because domaining is what they love, these seemingly inelegant individuals spend hours optimizing, pitching, switching and selling names behind the scenes.

Freelance DomainersFreelance domainers, my friend, crawl amongst the working population of the world, tending to be the happiest and best producing salespeople you’ll ever find – when on their game.  As a career minded professional, you’ll stare down the water cooler all day, waiting for Amy in accounting to show her strut while missing those important deadlines; just because you spent $190,000 on quality education, can you justifiably admit you’re having fun in spite of your outlandish benefits package? We testify that freelance domainers have all the fun yet leave little to no room for error in their salesmanship below:

Freedom Of Choice

One of the greatest liberties professionals enjoy in global office settings is choosing the work they do, as often as you wish to exercise that choice.  Whereas many people get piled with files and due dates that seem impossible to adhere to, a freelance domainer can gracefully choose his or her sales speed and always make the deadlines considering their level of stress is kept much lower.  Although some domain sales could take a fortnight to complete, the benefits lying in wait far exceed the efforts expounded in getting there.

Domainers experience unwavering exuberance because they’ll only take domains they know are an easy sell – leaving plenty of time to write about their domaining travails online in hopes of reaping more customers.  Sometimes they’ll take on portfolios, or several harder selling domain names, because the challenge is just too much fun. For those lacking sales savviness, keep this in mind: errors in describing, closing or proving analytical data may upset customers and lose that big sale quickly; outsourcing sales work to experienced freelance domainers all but guarantees results since the task of selling domains is all these hidden professionals do.

Never Miss A Moment

The early childhood development years are perhaps the most important for parents as discovery, emotion and hobby tends to reach fruition by age 7; dumping your kids off at a daycare facility five days a week adds up to 2,080 missed hours a year, on average, that we’ve lost with our child – hours one cannot get back.  Add longer work hours into the mix, and the missed moments continually pile higher.

With a freelance domainer, no moments are wasted while money otherwise spent on expensive daycare or Montessori schooling could get stowed away for your child’s college fund or even a new Lexus.  Most importantly, the time that may have been lost while away at the office is now returned for you to watch the funny moments and growing pains, whereas you stood in the background of such memories before.

In Closing: Freelancing Equals Freedom

Freelance domainers have too much fun while you, the seasoned professional, are stuck laboring for ‘the man’.  With sales work being outsourced by small and large businesses to hopefully save time and money, there is a golden opportunity to achieve the happiness of your own set schedule, spending more time with your family and friends, and make just as much – if not more – money during the process as you would in a normal office setting.  Jump aboard the freelance domainer train today before the market for domain sales workers becomes a fleeting memory.

Roger Kowalewski

Roger Kowalewski is a freelance writer and experienced domainer from Indiana. You can follow him on Google+.

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